twitter google

An Extra Drink A Day Shaves Years Off Your Life

An apple a day keeps the doctor away, but what does an extra drink do? According to a new study, it shaves years off your lifespan.

Recent research reviewed the drinking patterns of about 600,000 individuals spanning 19 different countries around the globe. The team looked at a little over 80 prospective studies that included numbers around individuals who drank alcohol, versus those who don’t. The study reviewed the alcohol consumption of 599,912 drinkers, where none of them had cardiovascular conditions at baseline and the team adjusted for factors like: a history of diabetes, age, sex, and smoking.

When all was said and done, the research revealed over 40,000 cases of death and just over 39,000 cases of cardiovascular conditions during the analyzation period. The study found that there were no benefits to moderate drinking, with the ‘safe’ limit being as low as seven ‘standard’ drinks weekly. In fact, anything over that could enhance the risk of early death.

Moreover, it was revealed that individuals who had seven to 14 standard drinks weekly were more likely to decrease their life expectancy by approximately six months. Those who had 14-25 drinks weekly would shave one to two years off their lives; and those with 25 standard drinks and up had four to five fewer years to live.

Life expectancy numbers were gathered for 40-year-old individuals who would drink at this continued rate for the remainder of his/her life.

Medical News Today revealed that the team also found a link between cardiovascular conditions and alcohol consumption. Higher alcohol intake was linked to an increased risk of fatal hypertensive illness, heart failure, and stroke.

So, what have we all learned from this study? A drink a day just might be okay, but don’t over that number. Consistent and continued alcohol consumption might seem like a fun and good idea at the moment, but the health repercussions can be deadly.

Sponsored Ad Listings


Follow RM Healthy

Search

New Articles